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Why This Valedictorian Loved Arizona Virtual Academy

Sarah Negovan Reflects on Her Online Experience

AZVA Valedictorian Sarah Negovan celebrates graduation with her family.

2016 Valedictorian Sarah Negovan truly found a home at Arizona Virtual Academy (AZVA). She began in the 7th grade and never looked back. Here are just a few reasons she loved her online experience:

The Academics

Sarah feels incredibly prepared for the Honors program at Northern Arizona University (NAU), which she will attend in the fall, thanks to the time management and self-motivation she learned from her time at AZVA. Sarah enjoyed having the flexibility to work at her own accelerated pace and loved being able to receive individualized help from teachers when necessary.

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Advocating for School Choice - The Power of YOUR Voice!

School choice advocates at the 2016 Parent Advocacy Boot Camp.

On July 10th over 100 teachers and parents met in Washington D.C. at Capitol Hill for the 2016 Parent Advocacy Boot Camp hosted by PublicSchoolOptions.org.  Jennifer Schultze, Wyoming Virtual Academy teacher describes how her advocacy efforts began and suggests ways you can get involved in your state.

When I first started my online teaching career, 7 years ago, I remember thinking what a great ‘choice’ it was for my family, personally.  Over the next year, I began to discover that just like I had made a career choice that was the best fit for my family, parents had the same motivation to find a school choice that best fit their family’s needs.

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No Challenge Can Stop the Smile and Success of MVCA Student Kayla Mason

MVCA student Kayla Mason takes her M-Step tests with her beloved stuffed cat, Amber.

Rising 4th grade Michigan Virtual Charter Academy (MVCA) student Kayla Mason is extremely spirited, bright, and hard-working, despite the physical disability she bravely faces.

“Kayla has cerebral palsy and is unable to walk, sit up, or use either of her hands efficiently on her own,” Kayla’s father, Bruce Mason, said. “What Kayla does have is an incredible mind and unstoppable spirit.”

Bruce enrolled Kayla in online schooling at MVCA as a second grader so that he is able to provide her with the one-on-one attention that allows her to thrive. Before MVCA, Kayla was unable to get the attention she deserves because she was one of 40 students at her school that needed support.

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Teacher Highlight: WAVA’s April Sorensen Makes an Impact

Aza L. (left) and Jayden P. (right) enhance their reading skills with the help of April Sorensen.

Much of a child’s achievement in school starts with reading. One Washington Virtual Academy (WAVA) teacher, April Sorensen, has gone above and beyond to ensure her students’ reading success. Two of Sorensen’s students, Aza L. and Jayden P., made huge reading gains after her work with the families.

Aza L.

Aza L. from Fall City, Washington, is a rising second grader at WAVA.

Shelby, Aza's mother and learning coach, says the transition from homeschooling to WAVA has been the perfect fit for their family. “We started off homeschooling Aza in preschool and found that coming up with the lessons on our own was very time consuming and frustrating. Aza started Kindergarten with WAVA and it was a perfect fit for us. It was wonderful that we were able to work at Aza’s pace and have a resource like April.”

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GCA’s Golden Girl Aniya Louissaint Punches Her Olympic Ticket

Aniya Louissaint graduated from Georgia Cyber Academy in May.

When recent Georgia Cyber Academy (GCA) graduate Aniya Louissaint was 14, she watched the remake of The Karate Kid with Jaden Smith and decided she wanted to learn martial arts.

It wasn’t an uncommon theme.

“When I was younger, I’d watch dance movies and I’d want to be a dancer; I’d watch a movie about a piano player and I’d want to be a pianist,” she said. “When I saw The Karate Kid, I really wanted to learn.”

One day, Aniya’s father, Richard Louissaint, surprised her and her younger sister, Kianna, by taking them to a taekwondo class. It didn’t go too well.

“I got beat up by everyone there,” Aniya said.

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