K12 Inc.'s picture

Weekly Roundup - 4.6.15

Weekly Roundup showcases stories and information about the students and schools we serve, K12 educators, and important education issues. 

Online schools offer customized education for students
(Upper Michigans Source)

Many parents are now looking to the internet for their children’s education. The Michigan Great Lakes Virtual Academy is online school run by K12.com. They provide education for students from kindergarten all the way through 12th grade. They are classified as a public school, so they are accredited just like any other public school. This also means the costs for the school would also be covered by the state.

Provider of online school programs entering second phase
(The Daily Times)

One year ago K12 Inc. came to Alcoa to announce it was opening its Family Support Campus in Blount County. With 152 employees on board in phase one, K12 plans on pushing its total employment numbers to more than 330 by the end of phase two in July. This is in addition to the 80 K12 teachers and educators currently employed throughout the state. K12 is expected to invest more than $2.4 million over the next five years.

K12 Inc. to Create More Jobs with Expansion of Family Support Campus
(Press Release)

K12 Inc., America’s leading provider of high quality online school programs, opened its Family Support Campus in Alcoa one year ago. Today, the education company announced it is launching phase two of its plan to expand the Campus and hire 150 new employees. 

G-E-N-I-U-S: Jackson Township siblings are among youngest Mensa members
(Times Reporter)

Akash and Amrita Vukoti of Jackson Township are among the youngest sibling pairs to be inducted into American Mensa, which is the exclusive high IQ society. Akash, who last year became a Davidson Institute young scholar, is 5 and Armita is a second-grader. They attend an online school.

Ashley Collier's picture

OHVA Student Siblings Are Among Youngest Mensa Members

The Times Reporter reports that Akash and Amrita Vukoti became one of the youngest sibling pairs to be inducted in American Mensa, a distinguished high intelligence organization where members must score in the top 2 percent of the general population on an accepted standardized intelligence test.

In 2013, Akash (then 3) and Amrita (then 5) were tested and accepted into American Mensa. Two years later, the siblings are enrolled at Ohio Virtual Academy, where the flexibility of online learning allows Akash and Amrita to learn at their own pace.

Read more about the Vukoti family, here.  

Now in its 13th year, Ohio Virtual Academy (OHVA) is welcoming families with students in grades K-12 to enroll for the 2015-2016 academic year. OHVA is open to all students who reside in Ohio and is hosting information sessions and upcoming community events. To find out more information, visit the OHVA school website.

K12 Inc.'s picture

Weekly Roundup - 3.30.15

Weekly Roundup showcases stories and information about the students and schools we serve, K12 educators, and important education issues. 

Former Tech students shepherd video game app to market
(Recorder)

Matt Boudah, 19, Avery Rovatti, 18, both of South Deerfield and Aaron Milewski 19, of Gill, show code and their finished product in The Recorder office. The trio, as Temple Studios,  have developed a video game app for iOS devices called Shear Resistance. The three know each other from the Franklin County Technical School’s programming and web development program, from which Boudah and Milewski graduated in 2013. Rovatti is finishing high school online with the Massachusetts Virtual Academy.

Letter: TN Virtual Academy should stay open
(Knoxville News Sentinel)

In a recent article about my school ("Though future in doubt, TN Virtual Academy fights on"), Union County's director of schools said that the staff, students and families of TNVA will continue to fight to remain open. I am one of those fighting.

Prodigies amaze, delight in Springtime Concert
(The Spectrum)

Guest conductor William Rhoden leads the Southwest Symphony Orchestra in a stunning event to showcase some of southern Utah's best and brightest young music artists April 3, at the Cox Performing Arts Center.

Rylee Dalton has been playing the violin since age six. In addition to the violin, Rylee loves to sing and act. She especially enjoys performing with her family at multiple venues and is a 10th grader at Utah Virtual Academy. Rylee performs the "Presto," also from Barber's "Concerto for Violin and Orchestra."

K12 Inc.'s picture

Weekly Roundup - 3.20.15

Weekly Roundup showcases stories and information about the students and schools we serve, K12 educators, and important education issues. 

UA Student Headed for Career in Special Education
(Inside Tucson Business)

University of Arizona student Kateri Hitchcock will be the one in cap and gown this May, but it’s others who will benefit most from her degree. Hitchcock, a 21-year-old Tucson native, was inspired to study special education because of her brother, Maximilian, 6, who was born with Down syndrome. Kateri, one of seven children, was homeschooled via the Arizona Virtual Academy, a state-certified online public schooling system. Being at home allowed her to help out with her brother, which while challenging at times, has been every bit as rewarding. 

POLL: Tennessee Voters Overwhelmingly Agree Public Schools Should Not Be Closed Based Solely on State Tests
(Press Release)

A recent poll by the Tarrance Group found an overwhelming majority of Tennessee registered voters oppose the closing of a public school based solely on results from the state's standardized test. The same poll found voters were even more strongly against state legislators who supported such closings. 

Though future in doubt, TN Virtual Academy fights on
(Knoxnews)

While Tennessee’s Education Commissioner Candice McQueen has upheld a decision to close the Tennessee Virtual Academy at the end of the year unless its scores continue to improve, school officials are still fighting for it.

Announcing Open Enrollment

K12 Inc.'s picture

Weekly Roundup - 3.16.15

Weekly Roundup showcases stories and information about the students and schools we serve, K12 educators, and important education issues. 

School Choice Parents Sue Tennessee Education Commissioner
(TN Watchdog)

Two sets of parents of children attending a Tennessee virtual charter school have filed a lawsuit to keep the school open. State officials want to shut it down after the school year. As reported, parents at Tennessee’s Virtual Academy said test scores are gradually improving, and closing the school now is premature.

11-year old just wants to skate
(Bluff Country News)

Laci Skifter, an 11-year-old, is always in motion…twirling, jumping, running, sliding into a room like she’s meant to arrive that way with an audience awaiting her.  But at the same time, she could care less if an audience was there – the Minnesota Virtual Academy student’s got her confidence spinning and ready for her next figure skating competition on Sunday, March 15, in Wisconsin.

Fuel Education Introduces 70 New High School Courses in its Expanded 2015-2016 Catalog
(Press Release)

As school districts across the country seek to expand high school course options, improve academic outcomes, and help students prepare for state exams and high stakes tests—personalized learning solutions provider Fuel Education (FuelEd™) has added 70 new high school courses to its online catalog for the 2015-2016 school year. These new courses—many available in multiple versions suitable for students working at a wide variety of levels—give FuelEd customers the offering they need to satisfy the needs of specific student segments.

Young authors and young fans and Festival of Books
(KGUN 9)

The University of Arizona mall and surrounding area was filled with thousands today for the first day of the Tucson Festival of Books. The event draws authors from all over for book signings like Amy Tan, Valerie Plame, Dave Barry and more. Among the list of renowned authors is a newcomer of sorts, 14-year-old China Dennington. Dennington says writing takes a long time, so she goes to Arizona Virtual Academy. It is an online public school.

Pages