pkeeney's picture

K12 Managed Schools Save Families Over $3.6 Million Dollars in Future Tuition Costs Through Dual Credit

This blog originally appeared on Learning Liftoff.

I’m afraid. I’m very afraid.

Like many of you, I am a parent. My son is a junior in high school, and I am afraid of the financial fallout from the next six years of his life.

First, I have to say I am proud of my son. He has worked hard, earned excellent grades, and has positioned himself to be accepted at colleges and universities that he wants to attend. He has caused minimal trouble, and is the type of young man I hoped he would be.

However, I become concerned when I see the upcoming “reward” for all of his hard work. He will spend four years accumulating college debt while he acquires a credential that will serve as his ticket into the best opportunities available to him within the workforce.

According to USA Today, “the class of 2014 graduated with an average student loan debt of $33,000.”Forbes recently cited that “student loan debt has reached a new milestone, crossing the $1.2 trillion mark — $1 trillion of that in federal student loan debt.” This represents a load on the average graduating student that is double what was seen 20 years ago, adjusted for inflation. As with any loan, while it might be needed to “buy” a college education, most people do not understand its cost. Over just 10 years, that original amount of $33,000 is likely to double as it is paid back, resulting in the graduate paying $66,000 of his hard-earned cash in payments. At $6,600 per year, $550 per month, that is a large bill for a new, well-qualified graduate. Welcome to the workforce!

For my son, this message is confusing: his hard work, intelligence, and effort is valuable, yet he will be hamstrung with significant taxes and loan payments that may total more than 50% of his pay for the first 10 years of his career.

Fortunately for him and others, there is a workaround: enter college with credits that you earned before you ever set foot on campus!

In most states, and in many high schools, students have the opportunity to begin college when they are ready, and do so at a reduced cost, or no cost. This is true for traditional, blended, and online high schools. Across K12’s network of managed public schools, families have saved more than $3.6 million dollars in future tuition costs by taking advantage of this opportunity. As students earned more than 6,000 college credits, they were earning more than college credits – they were earning the opportunity to keep more of their paycheck when they are in their twenties and thirties.

Perhaps most importantly, these opportunities now exist for students who will have to become skilled to do work that in past generations required only a high school diploma. This includes jobs in manufacturing, logistics, and transportation. In general, it is most difficult for those students who would be the first generation from their family to go to college, even if to a community college to earn an associate’s degree.

Elizabeth Street's picture

K12 Student Artist Achieves Fame and Success

This blog originally appeared on Learning Liftoff.

The media calls her a “pint-sized Picasso,” but while Picasso created his first painting at age 9 and began exhibiting them at age 13, Autumn de Forest started her fine arts career even earlier. She began painting regularly at 5 years old (though she created her first painting, “Elephant” at age 4) and displayed her art in public for the first time when she was 6. “I was the only kid there,” she says of her first art exhibit at the Boulder City Art Festival in Nevada, where she won first place. “I was the only one who came and [left] in a baby seat.”

Fortunately, this child prodigy has had the ability to pursue her passion for painting without sacrificing her education because she attends the K12 online learning school, Nevada Virtual Academy. Her flexible education schedule allows her to travel extensively; as she can connect with her courses and teacher anywhere by accessing the Internet. This is an especially convenient aspect of online learning as she and her parents are doing a lot of traveling these days.

Now, at the remarkably mature age of 12, this student artist has sold her pieces for as much as $26,000 each, has her own website, and has been interviewed by NBC’s Today Show, The Discovery Channel, Inside EditionThe Wendy Williams Show and PBS.

In addition to her many media appearances, Autumn speaks to school children across the country, donates her artwork to charity events, and was the youngest artist ever to speak at the National Art Education Association’s annual convention. She was even invited to speak at Harvard University about arts in education when she was 10.

While much of her varied work shows a strong influence from well-known artists like Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock and Vincent van Gogh, she has developed her own impressive painting techniques. One method, which she calls “pull painting,” involves placing two or more paint colors on one side of the canvas and running a wire over the paint to the other side of the canvas, creating swirls of complimentary colors. Autumn uses a variety of application techniques and canvases to create her art, which includes portraits, abstracts, Expressionism and Modern Surrealism.

With all her years of acclaim and success, Autumn still finds time to focus on her studies. She enjoys reading and says math and science are her favorite subjects. She recently agreed to be one the judges for K12‘s Annual Art Competition, which is currently underway through October 31st. Students from kindergarten through 12th grade are encouraged to submit their artwork showcasing this year’s theme—heroes. It could be a portrait, a scene—anything that conveys a hero in their lives.

Ashley Collier's picture

A K12 Student’s Perspective: What Does Online Learning Mean to You?

On November 6, Rile Grant, a 7th grade student enrolled at California Virtual Academies (CAVA) participated in a student panel at the International Association for K-12 Online Learning’s (iNACOL) Blended and Online Learning Symposium in Palm Springs, California.

Rile has been enrolled in his online school since 2nd grade and has taken such courses as: earth and life sciences, literature, world history, world art, music, Spanish 1 & 2, and Latin 1 & 2 to name a few. 

Rile and his family discussed their experience with online learning and shared views on the future of education.

Why does online and/or blended learning matter?

Families should have choices about where and how to educate their children. Being enrolled in an online school can provide stability and continuity for students if their families move a lot or are have other family issues to deal with which may cause changes in the student’s life. I started attending a virtual school when my family was displaced due to domestic violence and my mother wasn’t sure where we’d live and what kind of school district I’d be attending. A few years later, being in an online school made it possible for my mother and I to go to another county to care for my great grandfather, for about half a school year without having to change schools. We have moved about ten times since I started CAVA; being a virtual student has allowed me to stay in the same school for the past five years no matter what has happened in our personal lives.

What does online and/or blended learning mean to you?

Online means being able to do school anywhere: while traveling with your family, at the library, at coffee shops, or on vacation. Blended means having access to certain things, as if in a brick and mortar: seeing friends at school, getting in person help from teachers, and having a place to do group activities, such as spelling bees or science fairs.

What are the benefits?

Some students need a safe place to learn, free from bullying. My sister was bullied at two different public high schools and was able to continue, and graduate, through CAVA. Other students, who are advanced learners, need to be able to work at their own pace, without being held back. Every year I have been in CAVA, I have been working ahead of my grade level; I am a 6th grader on paper, but am working on the 7th grade. Because I do school at home, on my own schedule, I am able to focus on one topic or subject at a time - I do an entire science or history unit until I am finished with it, instead of having to stop working after a set time and then try to move onto another subject. I don’t have “homework,” adding hours to my day - I work on my assignments until they are done. If a subject is really interesting to me, I can learn about it in more ways than just through my textbooks or online lessons; I can find more information online, watch movies or documentaries or find places to visit in person to learn more. I have gone to science and art museums in my own city and others. Sometimes my science lessons happen at Sea World or an aquarium during a school day. I have traveled to the state capitol to talk to legislators. I will be traveling to San Francisco in a few weeks to attend the National Novel Writing Month’s annual Night of Writing Dangerously as the only young author to do so.

Being an online student means I have much more flexibility in my days.

Nate Davis's picture

A Pledge – High Fives for Bully-Free Lives

By this time students across the country have settled in to the 2014 school year.  They are familiar with their classes and teachers but they may also be familiar with a common problem that has received a lot of needed attention recently -- bullying.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reports that 1 in 3 students admit to being bullied at school and research has shown us that the developmental and psychological impact of bullying can lead to an increased risk for depression and anxiety in later years. What we see almost immediately on the traditional school level is that these children suffer academically, lose self-esteem, and they can be prone to self-harm. As some of us can personally attest to as parents and even from our childhood and young adult lives, bullying leaves children helpless and the emotional scarring can take years to heal. We know that most often, bullying takes place within the school environment – at play grounds, the school bus stop and even within the classroom, gym and locker rooms. At K12 we take sincere pride in the fact that we support a bully-free community in all of our online public schools. In fact, nearly one quarter of all of our families say they came to a K12-powered school because their child was bullied and an online school offered a bully free environment.

In recognition of National Bullying Prevention Month during the month of October, we want to demonstrate our support for raising kind children and giving them the bully-free lives they deserve.  On behalf of the more than 6,000 teachers and professional educators that I have the privelge of representing, I ask you to stand with us and take a pledge to raise awareness by taking part in our High Fives for Bully-Free lives campaign.

Submit a picture of you giving a high five in support of anti-bulling on social media and help us reach our goal of 10,000 high fives by taking the pledge.  As educators and parents we can protect our children from these cruel acts by creating a safe environment for bully-free lives.

Jeff Kwitowski's picture

Recycling Inaccurate News

On Thursday, The Huffington Post republished a month old article from a website called Capital & Main about K12 and online schools.  It should be noted that this online publication is funded by outside groups and special interests such as Teacher’s Unions, who oppose charter schools and parental choice in education.  The original article was littered with inaccuracies and misinformation, but that didn’t stop Huff Post from recycling the article on their website. 

Especially troubling is that an associate editor from Huffington Post emailed me on September 3 to let me know they were considering republishing and asking if I had any comment. I immediately responded with detailed facts disputing many of the claims made in the original article.  I also asked the Huff Post editor why they would republish an article with so many mistakes.

I never received a response.

Instead they republished the piece verbatim.  Here is the email response I sent to the Huff Post editor on September 3:

Thanks for reaching out prior to publishing.  I guess my first question is why republish this?  Not only does it contain many significant errors (both errors of fact and errors of omission), it is an online publication funded by Teacher’s Unions -- hardly an unbiased source of information.  

Is there anything specifically you want me to respond to?  As I said, the article is wrong on many counts.  For example, the President of Agora’s Board of Trustees sent the writer a comprehensive statement, but the writer ignored most of it, and contrary to what the Board president wrote, suggested in his story that Agora was “completely severing” its relationship with K12.  That’s not true.  K12 continues to provide Agora with curriculum and school services, as we do with over 2,000 schools and school districts across the country.  It is not uncommon to restructure services agreements with existing school partners, and, in some cases, we do so to expand the level of services we provide.  Furthermore, as the statement clearly says, Agora’s President made it very clear that the Board’s issuance of the RFPs was “not an indication of K12’s performance under the current contract.”  K12 respects the independence of all our school partners, including Agora, and is responding to the RFP.  I would encourage you to reach out to the Agora Board of Trustees if you are looking for a response.

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