Lauren Weber's picture

Preparing to Dig into the Data

Now that school has begun and we are well into the first quarter, it’s time for teachers to start asking ourselves, are our students learning? It seems like a pretty simple and straight forward question, but it actually requires a lot of data analysis to truly and honestly answer this question.

Teachers at K12 schools across the country have really taken the initiative to delve deeper into our student’s progress. We do not simply rely on a student’s overall score at the end of each quarter to decide if the student is meeting their academic potential. We start much earlier than this. First, we construct well thought out interim assessments that align with our state standards and content objectives. These assessments can be given multiple times a year or semester. After students take these assessments, we spend days analyzing the results.

We meet with our department teams and go over our findings and we ask ourselves some very important questions. We analyze why a student missed a certain question or did not grasp a certain standard or objective. Was it the way the concept was taught? Is there a better way I can re-teach this to the student?  Why did the student or students fail to master this standard or objective? These are just a few of the questions we ask ourselves in these sessions that we dedicate to data analysis.

After we analyze our data and spend time on self-reflection, we then identify ways we can increase academic achievement and student mastery of standards and objectives, especially for our at-risk students. Some of these ways are incorporating small group sessions and 1 on 1 help sessions that target certain standards that the students struggled with. These small group sessions or one-on-one's require teachers to rethink our teaching process. Maybe the initial way we taught the idea or concept was fantastic for some students, but not ideal for others. During these smaller sessions, outside of regular class, is a time when teachers can differentiate our instruction and focus on meeting the needs of these individual students. We then track the student’s progress and meet with them regularly to analyze their growth, consistently asking ourselves along the way if there is something else we can try or do to improve their academic success.

Implementing data driven instruction in our schools has been monumental to our growth and success. Pass rates are growing, student engagement is on the rise, and family involvement is increasing. Learning Coaches are so supportive and encouraging when teachers reach out to them and offer extra supports for their students. By looping in Learning Coaches and sharing the progress that we have tracked and monitored with these additional sessions, we are seeing a strengthened partnership between Learning Coach, student, and teacher that is essential for online success.

Ana Berry's picture

Teacher Perspective: The Spark

There’s a common misconception that if a student isn’t in the same room as a teacher they aren’t receiving the same quality of learning. That’s just false.

Even though my students and I are not in the same room there’s still a spark – the ‘oh yeah!’ in a chat window that lets me know a student gets it. That feeling is thrilling to me.

I teach math online at the Louisiana Virtual Charter Academy (LAVCA) and for me the leap from teaching in the traditional classroom to an online classroom was not a large one. I’ve been able to use similar materials and create strong intellectual connections – I feel as though I know my students even better than I did when we were face to face five times a week.

 In the online environment my students are able to be open with me about what they’re struggling with which allows me to develop a specific learning plan just for them. That’s how we drive success at LAVCA – creating connections with students to find what learning pathway works best for them.

Last school year I received a thank you message from a family of one of my students about how their son had suffered a great deal of bullying in his previous school. I was told that this student had lacked confidence to speak up in class during the beginning of the year. Throughout the year, he grew to be a regular contributor in class and the family conveyed that he has a renewed excitement for school.

There are so many stories that show how this education model can transform not just learning outcomes but a student’s life.